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. doesn't that sound like east of the mississippi. the jackpot surging to $448 million. hours before that drawing as millions line up hoping they would be the lucky winners. we will have a live report from one of the locations coming up. >>> let's go to a fox news alert. the manhunt for kidnapping of two children. amber alert in states of oregon and washington. this after the suspect's car was believed to have been spotted heading north. anna kooiman is here. she has the latest details on the story. what do we know this morning? >> this is new overnight. oregon state police saying there was a possible sighting of james dimaggio's nissan and another 15 miles away along the same highway in oregon. >> we are trying to get as many people out there looking for that vehicle with that plate and with the suspect and what we hope are two children in that vehicle. >> dimaggio may be headed to canada. the close family friend is accused of murdering the mother of hannah and ethan anderson and setting the house on fire. police found her body inside along with the remains of a child possibly 8-yea
wife called 911. >> my has has been shot. >> mississippi stretched a mile -- what's your name? >> karla porter. >> do you know the person? >> no. i never seen him before before. he was black and he just came in the side door. i went out and he came in. >> police say her whole story is a lie. she master minded a plan to have her husband murdered. she even enlisted the help of several people, including her sister, brother and nephew to hire hit man walter bishop. >> bishop told police he was promised $9,000 by karla who only asked one question when it was over. >> she asked if he was dead. i said i guess. she okay. >> during a long interrogation with police karla porter broke down. during her tearful confession she claimed her husband mentally and physically abused her. >> i didn't want any of this to happen. i didn't. >> what happened, car karla? >> he was just being really mean. >> reporter: porter was the last of five conspirators to go to trial. the hitman was sentenced to life in prison. i'm mike schuh reporting live in towson. back to you. >> thank you. if porter is co
view is former mississippi governor ronnie muss grove of the chair of southern progress fund. a multistate pact that plans to ensure their resources are put towards democrats in the south. thank you for joining me today. >> thank you for having me. >> tell us about the plan you will be announcing tomorrow. >> we have all scent republicans take over the state legislature. and produce an agenda that would make strom thurmond blush. i sit back and think someone will lead the charge against this loonicy. it didn't happen. so we plan it change that. >> if we look at democratic shift, the emerging election torate we saw in 2008 and 2012 seems like it'll play a huge role in opportunities in the south. >> not only that, if you look at the actual numbers, for instance, in arkansas, we would only have to flip two seats in the house for it to go democrat. three in louisiana. four in mississippi. receiven in alabama. if you start looking at those numbers, and you look at the democratic -- demographic shields happening all across the south, i plef it is a great opportunity for us a to bui
right. pull out, everybody. i'll let you watch. >> mississippi. 7 mississippi. fail. >> and in fact, the car flips over. >> oh, my gosh. >> can you believe this? the dash camera catches everything. rolls over on its side. and flips. apparently the translation in korean is great. roll it again. we'll just have some fun. but apparently the driving instructor says "brake, brake, brake!" [ bleep ], what do we do? what do we do? as the car starts turning over on its side. right about here. okay. >> oh, oh, oh. >> he says, what are you doing, don't know which gas pedal you are pressing! i'm going crazy! get out of this car! >> i could have done the translation from what she was doing. you can hear her go oh, oh, oh, oh. >> it sounds the same in any language, the expletive. doesn't it? >> oh, oh, oh. >> failed in seven seconds. worst driver ever! >> and over again. >>> here is a video you are going to want to watch. this one is great. group of young youtubers, true story asa team have posted a video of themselves, they usually -- they're pranksters. this time they changed up the tone. this
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
? guest: it is certainly a valid point. host: let's try charles from mississippi. republican line. hi, there. caller: my question to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area -- how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not kno
gain, long-term rip. finally the ugly, a failed attempt to outrun the law. a suspect in mississippi tried to jump into a river to get away from police but there was one problem. he was still wearing handcuffs and then he needed to be rescued. >> time for your favorite viral video of the week. was it the bowler whose chances for a perfect game was shattered by a malfunctioning machine, the naked fan at the concert or a door -- dog who opened the door for his three-legged friend? >> rachel says i'm glad he got tackled. that is what should when you do something stupid like that. >> kathy tweets how cute is that? what a moment. it looks like man's best friend is also dog's best friend. >> the web page poll was tied between the bowler and the dog. >> have a good weekend. "fox & friends" starts right now. >> great to be here at "fox & friends." it is the ninth of august, 2013. i'm anna kooiman in for gretchen carlson. >>> a dangerous twist to an already disturbing story. authorities warning the california man who allegedly kidnapped the 16-year-old girl after killing her mother and possib
. , james is ini ocean springs, and he supports same-sex marriage. >> yes, and mississippi, of .ourse, does not recognize i am originally from louisiana, and it is not recognized. but just like all other civil progress, the south as far behind. it will take some time to reach it, but we will eventually get there. lived inng have you mississippi? >> just over a year. of the time i spent in louisiana and i lived in baileys, central america, for the last five years before e,ming to mississippi -- beliz central america, for the last five years before coming to mississippi. >> mark, go ahead with your comment. thismain point to all of is, we live in a great country and everybody has the right to be wrong. everybody has the right to be right. what we have here is a battle over semantics, i think. can be think the union called marriage because marriage is a sacrament. it is sacred. it is holy. , a homosexual marriage, is sodomy. that is not holy. that is an unholy union. if you want to go ahead and have the government take care of all of your finances and everything after you die, then call it som
tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi rise? >> mr. speaker, unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i'm not a fan of government mandates, and neither are my constituents in mississippi. but there is one mandate that the people of mississippi sent me to washington with, to repeal, replace, dismantle, delay, and defund obamacare. i have heard from families, small businesses, and hardworking americans across my district who all have the same message -- this law is a train wreck. mr. palazzo: that is why one of my very first votes in congress was to repeal obamacare. that's why i voted to repeal it nearly 40 times over the last three years. that is why i introduce add constitutional amendment to restore the right of the american people to refuse this bad law. that is also why i firmly believe we must defund obamacare in a continuing resolution this body will take up later this year. i believe this is a fight worth fighting for mississippi. and
, minnesota, minnesota, georgia, florida. i point out mississippi, minnesota, georgia, and florida. we know the stereotypes that probably are quite true when you look at the food culture of some of those southern states. >> the southeast does struggle. i come from a long line of obesity. i think the real message is it doesn't matter where you live. it doesn't matter if your mother, grandmother, father, aunts, uncles, in my case, they're all obese. that doesn't mean i have to be obese. we're seeing a transition. >> so preschool the study was followed preschoolers. that is such a smart move. that's where it has to happen. >> i want to read the first lady's response to the numbers. she says today's announcement reaffirms my belief that together we are making a real difference in helping kids across the country get a healthier start to life. i see it as a balance of kids. you can play the video games but you can go on your bike. >>> i know it's not always easy to nurse. it was tricky. i had a lifestyle that made it doable for me. so i hope that i'm so glad to see more women nursing. i'm so glad
.s. senate. the answer is seven beginning in 1870 with rebels of mississippi. this year marked the first time that two ochls servafrican-amer simultaneously served in the senate and if cory booker wins next month, two african-americans together in the senate. lee is the winner! send your suggestions at msnbc.com. we will be right back. ♪ you don't have the time to hang around ♪ ♪ [ whimpers ] - hugs from beneful baked delights... - [ barks ] are crispy, oven-baked dog snacks with soft savory centers, made with beef and cheese. beneful baked delights: a unique collection of four snacks... to help spark play in your day. because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities.. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfect
's day that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. 13 people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than 13 months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the
. but across the states of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, and texas, maybe not. >> we're going to stop you for not having a gun. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: there you go. exactly. yeah, i guess that's -- you know, that's a state by state issue, chris. >> it is. >> stephanie: killed an unarmed teenager -- all right. okay. daryle in mobile -- >> caller: [ inaudible ] mobile, stephfy. >> stephanie: hi daryle go ahead. >> caller: i was doing 80 and a black guy got ahead of me speeding, and i got pulled over, and i had my police t-shirt on, and i had my weapon on my side. he said okay. i need your license and registration. but he did give me a ticket. >> stephanie: yikes. yeah, interesting. interesting. i guess you are not quite as awesome as george zimmerman. >> caller: i guess not. when i seen that on the news. i said, wow, what a break. >> stephanie: yeah, you are not quite as white looking as george zimmerman. maybe that's what it is. >> wow. >> stephanie: just yet another incredible story, how about incredible that awesome -- >> he's so awesome. >> stephanie: right. he is just g
. but i wonder if an iconic white figure from south carolina or mississippi or alabama -- >> bill: but she comes out -- less than a month ago, right. she comes out and uses the "n" word and planning this birthday party for her brother and she's going to have -- this will be cute. we'll have it like a plantation birthday party and all of the waiters will be black waiters all dressed up and yes, sir, this and yes, sir, that. and is dropped by all of her sponsors. does she have anybody left? the book deal. she had a three-book deal. that was canceled. sponsors dropped her. she's in all of this trouble. yet she comes out, 73% positive compared to 59% among -- again, on republicans, in georgia. >> what i want to know is what's not to like about martin luther king? what's unfavorable about martin luther king? i can think of one thing that republicans in georgia find unfavorable. >> bill: i can, too. i guess maybe he doesn't make a mean enough peach pie. 1-866-55-press. let's talk about it here on the "full court press." >> announcer: get social with bill press. like us at facebook.com/billpresss
down to alabama and mississippi and tennessee to unionized those work places with the new german model. tracy: they want to have a decision team that sits on the company's board? it sounds crazy. >> also work councils and different groups like that and they say it works in germany but those jobs have moved from tennessee -- from germany to tennessee and their growth rate has them lower than ours even a we have not had a very good growth rate recently as 1.7% tracy: i understand the logic. they come to tennessee purposely because it is right to work not to do with the union nonsense but said the union thinks we can convince them otherwise? >> exactly also the auto companies and the south are adding workers nissan has 5,000 and one to add another 2,000. of they are expanding by at jeep is moving to new china for the export market not even expanding in ohio to one that is crazy but your point that membership has fallen with 11 percent of the work force in the unit is down from 20%. >> and only 6 percent of private-sector workers are in the union right ow. tracy: what is the incentive to
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
over the mississippi river, 16 feet more to go. i could watch this go down the nation's greatest river. it was an awesome view. the people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. he represents pennsylvania's ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. thanks for that great example that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. we look forward to those engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. as i have traveled around the coeeg what other
, they essentially were the storm troopers of the movement. they went into the mississippi delta where other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her, out of the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, who went to school just one day period in her entire life. i would argue it's one of the most eloquent spokesperson for the aims of the movement. the speech given at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can youtube it. if you've not heard it, hear it. it is the most eloquent statement that i've heard, courageous woman. i mean, there's definitely her, but, again, i think if we move from the national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of the most exciting things about doing this history, being involved in this scholarly production of literature about the sighful rights movement is that we have a lot of good stuff coming out that is talking about the local activists who are anonymous for the most part, but without whom you would not have had a national movement, and if we go back to the point of where we are at today, clearly, it's a point where we have to b
we're looking at some heat in texas on into the mid-mississippi river valley. 90s in interior sections of the southwest. some showers making their way from northeast new england on into the ohio valley. monsoonal moisture into the >>> 8:08 only a thursday morning. good morning, i'm meteorologist christina loren. temperatures are warming up nicely. we are at 64 right now in sunnyvale. 61, san jose, 61 to kick off the day in livermore. as we take you through the hour by hour changes, about 77 in livermore, 65 in oakland. so, running about three to five degrees cooler this afternoon. also, you will probably notice less humidity out there, so it feels more true to the temperatures that we are accustomed to here in the bay area this time of year. hold onto those norms as we get into the upcoming weekend. >> and that's your latest weather. matt? >> all right. al, thanks so much. more new of our exclusive conversation with california kidnapping survivor hannah anderson as she speaks out for first time. nbc's national correspondent kate snow is out in san diego. good morning again. >>
you, mr. president. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, i'm very pleased to be able to join my colleagues in wishing dave schiappa well in his next adventure in life, and knowing it will be successful, and also build upon his knowledge and experience here in the u.s. senate. i know his contributions will continue, and it will be a pleasure to continue to follow him in whatever career or noncareer or on vacation, whatever he chooses to do, will be happy and rewarding as has his tenure here in the united states senate. no one is more respected, more appreciated than david schiappa. so it is a sad day in many ways to see him leave, but a happy one to know that he's going to begin a new era, and we will watch him closely and stay in touch with him and continue to appreciate him for throughout his career and life. the presiding officer: the senator from wyoming. mr. barrasso: mr. president, i'd just like to add to the comments. in wyoming, we have what's called the code of the west. and while david schiappa may be the m
arkansas. we have flash flood watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river. they stretch west back towards wichita where a flood watch is in effect. the heavy rain is coming down in buckets. we had severe thunderstorm watches this morning. we are seeing the heavy rain now pushing into northwestern arkansas. we have frequent cloud to ground lightning and torrential downs. we'll keep an eye out for flooding for the next several hours. the showers in the northeast brought on by the cold front. clouds with spotty showers. the best chance of stronger storms besides areas in missouri and arkansas will be in eastern colo . >>> we see temperatures around the bay area in the 50s with low clouds and drizzle and mist around san francisco. notice the winds. very strongly onshore and in the north bay. the all day sea breeze. temperatures mostly in the 60s from san francisco to oakland and 70s and 80s south of downtown san jose and low 80s in the trivalley. the trend will continue into monday with a slightly stronger sea breeze that means more cooling early next week. >>> that's your latest
appendectomy at a hospital in jackson, mississippi. the 71-year-old is expected to make a full recovery. >>anna: 32 minutes after the hour. how do you stop government leaks? get rid of the humans. a new dramatic step that is just being announced by the n.s.a. director at its cyber security conference. the plan, replace computer system administrators with machines. >> what we are in the process of doing, but not fast enough, is reducing our system administrators by about 90% for the first reason, which was to make our networks more defensible and more secure. >>anna: this plan was apparently already in place before the leaks but is now being sped up. >>peter: overnight a wild police chase ends with a suspect's car crashing and flipping over. take a look with us. >> you're going to have to make a turn here. look at this. off to the dirt and through the fence and rolling. >>peter: it happened in california. the man behind the wheel accused of carjacking that kia van. after about 20 minutes he finally got out of the car with a few bumps and bruises and then surrendered to police. any choice? i don'
: and you aren't very patient. caller you are on the line. >> caller: originally i have from mississippi and grew up in the south and i dropped out but eventually i went back in and went to college and moved to ohio and got a job. sometimes at church talk about history in america and how we treat one another eye of a big fan of frederick douglass also with the peace that he wrote the real question for the command in question whether american justice and american the ready, american civilization is the american in christianity can be made for ever all citizens. but not to be educated by history, as i talk to people about where i came from, my struggles, living in the south, talking to black people they see they do not comprehend what we talk about with the struggle in to where we came from. >> host: we will get a response from randall robinson. >> guest: i a understand very much how you feel. you can have often much reason or expectation of anything different. i have taken a the position particularly because in my view it is our do that doesn't mean we expect they will materialize in my l
opportunity. let me conclude with this. generations, if this is 20th-century mississippi -- or 20th-century mali, young people have risked their safety and given their lives to give the -- get the education that has opened their potential. she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear. we want school and education for will child, and we continue the journey to our destination of these and education. nobody can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change to our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service and your commitment, your creativity and courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no more >> to fall through, no more barriers to run into and no more threats to their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. if you want peace, work for justice, it has been said. we know this cuts to the root of if we wantallenge -- justice and peace, we must work for education. thank you so much, and i am happy to take your questions. [applause] >> is that working? mayb
to egypt. gary, greenville, mississippi, republican. good morning. gary, are you there? caller: i am. host: go ahead, sir. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i don't understand how some report the current administration in egypt because they were elected by the people. and we the american people, we supported their election. i mean, even john mccain who's a celebrated veteran said that this is a coo there. so i'm not so much for or against anything, but i think when americans call your show that we should understand that we supported this democratic effort that took place in egypt. and we should consider those things before we get on here talking negatively or positively about the subject. but i just don't understand how e're so kind of shallow in our support for the previous administration in egypt because again, they were duly elected by the people and then secondly as i mentioned before, one of the most celebrated veterans in this nation, senator mccain went there. he visited, so on and so forth, and he said that the -- that it was a coo. so that's just my thoughts. hos
collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the senate passed a bipartisan
north georgia, mississippi, we'll have storms. we'll dry it out in areas like missouri who desperately need it. we leave you with the shot of washington, d.c. let's get the ball rolling. along the jersey shore, coca-cola is partnering with local businesses and the seaside heights business improvement district to restore the historic boardwalk, welcoming beach lovers back with a refreshed and revitalized place to get out, get moving, and have some fun in the sun. it's part of our goal to inspire more than three million people to rediscover the joy of being active this summer. see the difference all of us can make... together. the last thing i want is to feel like someone is giving me a sales pitch, especially when it comes to my investments. you want a broker you can trust. a lot of guys at the other firms seemed more focused on selling than their clients. that's why i stopped working at my old brokerage and became a financial consultant with charles schwab. avo: what kind of financial consultant are you looking for? talk to us today. [ laughing ] ...is the crackle of the campfire. it c
. it is beginning at this time. >> headers on the phone from jackson,, mississippi. what is your question? >> i would like to know who ran against james k. polk when he was running for president and did sarah polk play the part? >> polk runs against henry clay from kentucky. clay had run twice again before this. he thinks it is his turn. he expects it will be a cake walk, because nobody has heard of jim spoke. he makes a number of mistakes during the campaign, and in the end, in a very close vote, clay loses to polk. oddly enough, he carries polk's home state. >> the issue of a presidential campaign at that time, very different from what we see today. it was considered a proper for the candidate to be called to office. active campaigning went to state offices like the governor. the candidates did not show up at the nominating conventions, afterwards when the were drafted and accepted the nomination, air with letters and the editor, but very little stump -- no stumping at all. sarah was her husband's campaign manager for his congressional campaign and gubernatorial campaign. during the president
the storm troopers of the movement. they went into the mississippi delta, where other organizations were afraid to go. and out of the mississippi delta, a sharecropping family. by her own account, went to school only one date in her entire life. i would argue she was one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. the speech that she gave the democratic national convention in 1964, you can youtube it. if you have not heard it, hear it. it is one of the most eloquent statements i've heard. a courageous woman. but again, if we move from the national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of the most exciting things about being involved in the scholarly production of the civil rights movement, we have a lot of really good stuff that is coming up that is talking about these local activists who are anonymous for the most part with a national movement. and if we go back to where we are today clearly, we are at a place where we have to think of very local terms the action is going to be at the state level. living in kansas, i would argue kansas is a laborat
into a settlement agreement with the school district in meridian, mississippi, in which we found egregious examples of disproportionate suspension, expulsion, and school-based arrests. a black male high school student was told by one of his teachers that when he got older, he would either be in hell or in jail. andas suspended subsequently arrested for wearing the wrong socks to school. there was another black male high school student. an administrator asked him to tuck your shirt into his pants. he refused. the principal grabbed him in a headlock and he school security officer sprayed the student with mace. he was arrested and sent to juvenile detention. aree kinds of examples horrible. they have lifelong -- often lifelong consequences for students who are treated in this way. often times, they are unlawful. that is where the justice department can come in. we enforce the laws that bar discrimination by schools based on race, national origin, sex, and religion. that is what we did. we went into meridian, we investigated, we found that black students received harsher disciplinary consequences. susp
this huge crowd from mississippi. >> how has your time in new york been? >> wonderful. is coming here the highlight? >> absolutely. >> we are talking about his fire with areas of the west. >> overnight it went from a 60,000 acre fire to a 120,000 acre fire. 150 miles from san francisco you might think they get a big part of their water. 80% of their water comes from the hetch hetchy reservoir. there is rainfall going into the southwest. it won't come on shore with the tropical storm. southern california could be getting heavy rain falling in quick amounts of time. all of the areas that you see have flood watches and warnings going on. a couple of inches of rain have fallen and there is flooding going on. we'll send it back to you inside. >> well, remember the benghazi attacks were at a year september 11th, 2012 and we still don't have a lot of answers and folks behind bars. suspects have been identified in this attack. we are learning new information and sources told fox news that the special operations group that we put in charge of getting these guys are getting out. here is what a
or in mississippi or in illinois or in california. across this country, people are demanding comprehensive immigration reform, and the end of the deportations of the direction of our families -- destruction of the family. someone in the -- i was in minneapolis-saint paul. the church was full. she bemoaned the fact that more people didn't come. they didn't come. and some were tired and frustrated and they were disillusioned. guess what? virginia is giving the example today no one has a right to be tired. [cheering and applause] nobody has a right to be disillusioned. nobody has a right to give up on this fight. because today 1,200 people will be deported. hundreds of children will be left without a poem -- mom or a dad. without husband or wife. the fear that permeates our community and the underclass that exploited every day has to come to an end. you don't are -- have a right to be tired. you have a responsibility to fight and make it a greater and better nation for us to live. virginia today is giving that example. thank you so much. [applause] [cheering and applause] [inaudible] [speakin
with this. for generations, 20th century mississippi here on 21st century somali. they have risked their safety and given their live to get the education that will unlock their full potential. it from the podium, she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear, we want schools and education for every child's bright future. we will continue our journey to our destination of peace and education. no one can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change through our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service, your commitment, your creativity, and your courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no cracks for students to fall through. no more barriers to run in to. and no more threat of their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. it's been said that if you want peace, wok for justice. we know that one solution cuts to the root, cuts to the very heart of the challenges con flingting our collective humanity. if we want both justice and peace we must work for educa
of 2007, when in the middle of a summer's day, that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as they said that day, a bridge should not just fall down in the middle of america. not an eight lane bridge in the middle of rush hour, and not a bridge that is six blocks from my house. people were killed. hundreds of people injured. do you know what we do when it does break down, when something like that happens in america? we rebuild. lessbuilt that bridge in than 13 months. we rebuild just like they are rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild just like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild, because that is what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure. it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and are -- our dams. [applause] senatee do you think the passed the bipartisan waterville, what are develop and act -- water bill, water development act? in ourve served military, denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied entry. the senate finally passed a bipartisan, comprehensive immigration bill w
is katrina, read the, gustav, ike, the mississippi oil spill, recently tropical storm isaac. some of the concerns we have is how can we evacuate have the coast line in a 38 hour period i know who to go to and how long it is going to take. how many will be evacuated or not, how many can help themselves, how many will be the state's assistance, how many of those will need federal assistance? i can tell you. and even less night. all of a sudden i found myself not coming up with words and anxious about what i would say to u.s. policy makers and by fire that we are asking for your help to advocate for the dollars to be returned because of the things that i know, in terms of operations. and i can tell you just from the american red cross has a 23 sq. feet per person that wouldn't come up with capacity numbers for rebuilding that has been increasing as recommendations are made through groups such as yourself. we should have various things for children so that capacity is now increasing to about 52 square foot per person. what does that mean in terms of operations? that means the number o
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